Skin Flick by Norm Foster: Book Review

Skin Flick

Obtained: Playwrights Canada Press
Pages: 112
Publish date: March 13, 2017
Rating: ★★★★

SUMMARY

Middle-aged couple Daphne and Rollie and their friend Alex are out of work and out of luck when they get the idea to make their own porno film for some quick cash. The only problem is none of them want to star in it. As if on cue, a birthday telegram messenger arrives on their doorstep…

Goodreads

WHAT I LIKED

I wasn’t sure what the tone of this play was going to be when I picked it up, but as soon as I started reading, I could not stop chuckling to myself. Rollie narrates the story to the audience directly, telling the story of how their idea to make a porn film came to be, and these narration often influence the characters acting out the story. Rollie decides to censor their language, and the characters become aware of the fact that their “F-words” get bleeped out. He also changes details mid-story and they get confused as to why they’re saying one thing when they wanted to say another. I thought the narration and breaking the fourth wall was extremely clever and entertaining.

I also enjoyed how dynamic and fun the characters were to read. I didn’t feel like any of them were particularly flat or conventional, which was refreshing for a comedy. And on a bit of a deeper level, I really liked the way the play addressed the topic of sex. Each character had their own viewpoint that wasn’t right or wrong. Sex wasn’t just meaningful, and it wasn’t just a meaningless act.  It was dependent on the situation and the individuals involved, and I thought that was a really great approach to the topic.

AND WHAT I DIDN’T

Honestly, there wasn’t any part of reading this play that I didn’t enjoy. The only reason I gave it 4 stars instead of 5 is because I wasn’t totally blown away (pun intended?). It was funny and I had a great time imagining the staging of this production, but it isn’t going to go down as one of my all-time favourites. And that is what a 5-star rating is reserved for, in my books.

RECOMMEND IF…

  • You’re looking for a great, live comedy;
  • You’re open to learning about various opinions on sex;
  • You have an hour to kill and want to laugh.

Skin Flick is available online at Chapters Indigo, Book Depository, and Kobo.

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When Dimple Met Rishi by Sandhya Menon: Book Review

Image result for when dimple met rishi

Obtained: Simon & Schuster Canada, ARC
Pages: 380
Publish date: May 30, 2017
Rating: ★★★★

SUMMARY

Dimple Shah has it all figured out. With graduation behind her, she’s more than ready for a break from her family, from Mamma’s inexplicable obsession with her finding the “Ideal Indian Husband.” Ugh. Dimple knows they must respect her principles on some level, though. If they truly believed she needed a husband right now, they wouldn’t have paid for her to attend a summer program for aspiring web developers…right?

Rishi Patel is a hopeless romantic. So when his parents tell him that his future wife will be attending the same summer program as him—wherein he’ll have to woo her—he’s totally on board. Because as silly as it sounds to most people in his life, Rishi wants to be arranged, believes in the power of tradition, stability, and being a part of something much bigger than himself.

Goodreads

WHAT I LIKED

First of all, I loved the diversity in this book. I love reading about different cultures and traditions, and this book actually gave me a great insight into a culture that isn’t my own.

The story was also super adorable. It was so sickly sweet that I found myself d’awww-ing out loud. I find a lot of YA romances feel interchangeable and eventually I begin to mix them up in my head, but you just know right off the bat that When Dimple Met Rishi is going to be a rom com to remember. All of the little details in the novel – Insomnia Con, Dimple and Rishi’s separate dreams and passions in life, the Bollywood dance routine – are ones that will make this YA romance stand out against all of the other ones for me.

Dimple and Rishi were great, and I actually really loved Dimple as a strong female lead. I could imagine her perfectly in my head, and I related to her quite a bit.

AND WHAT I DIDN’T

Honestly, I felt the ending to this book was kind of rushed. There was only 100 pages left and Insomnia Con still had three weeks to go. I kind of wished all of the plots had more time to wrap up; it was literally the halfway-point of Insomnia Con and then the next paragraph was “we’re announcing the winners”.

My other issue with this book is that I didn’t particularly like the secondary characters – Celia and especially the Aberzombies – seemed very flat. The “bad guys” were so over-the-top “bad” that I just couldn’t believe them. I wish they’d had more redeeming qualities to make them more well-rounded.

RECOMMEND IF…

  • You love cheesy romantic comedies;
  • You crave some diversity in your reading;
  • You want a read that will keep you smiling the whole way through;
  • You’d like to gain perspective about social privilege.

When Dimple Met Rishi is available online at Chapters Indigo, Book Depository, and Kobo.

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Huff & Stitch by Cliff Cardinal: Book Review

Huff & Stitch

Obtained: Playwrights Canada Press
Pages: 112
Publish date: March 27, 2017
Rating: ★★★★

SUMMARY

Huff is the wrenching, yet darkly comic tale of Wind and his brothers, caught in a torrent of solvent abuse and struggling to cope with the death of their mother.

Wind’s fantastic dream world bleeds into his haunting reality, as he’s preyed on by the Trickster through the hallways at school, the abandoned motel he loves more than home, and his own fragile psyche.

-from Native Earth Performing Arts

Kylie Grandview, single mom, and one of the nameless faces that blip across the screens of internet pornography is seduced by her dreams of starring in a main stream movie. In a twisted, turning series of self-sabotaging decisions ultimately resulting in the loss of her child, Stitch is Kylie’s last ditch effort to tell the truth about what happened to her face.

-from Native Earth Performing Arts

WHAT I LIKED

I’ll say right off the bat, I enjoyed reading Stitch more than I enjoyed reading Huff. They evened out to four stars because one earned 3 stars from me, while the other was a 5. Both plays utilized the idea of characters that were personifications of things (in Huff, a character represented smell, while in Stitch, there was a character representing a yeast infection – yup). Which I really liked – I love that theatre has the ability to make visual things that typically aren’t visually accessible.

I found that Stitch was a more interesting read for me, because it addressed a lot of feminism and gender issues. It was really disturbing to think about Kylie’s daughter stumbling upon the porn starring her mother and even reenacting the scenes with her friends, but it also made me feel sad that women kind of fall into the expectation that their worth is dependent on their appearance and their sex appeal. There are many more things I could write about regarding this play, but for now I’ll leave it at this: if you’re interested in reading about women’s issues, this is a great read.

AND WHAT I DIDN’T

I don’t think I particularly didn’t like anything about either play, I just don’t think I related much with Huff, so I felt more disconnected reading that one. I think I’d like to see it on stage before coming up with a final opinion on the play.

RECOMMEND IF…

  • You like reading theatre; and
  • You can stomach reading disturbing scenes.

Huff & Stitch is available online at Chapters Indigo, Book Depository, and Kobo.

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Black Dog: 4 vs the Wrld by Matthew Heiti: Book Review

Black Dog: 4 vs the wrld

Obtained: Playwrights Canada Press
Pages: 112
Publish date: March 14, 2017
Rating: ★★★★

SUMMARY

A darkly comic story of four teenagers struggling with death, depression, and the shadow of a black dog.

Two is fraught. While dealing with the impossible expectations of her parents, she is trying to understand why her brother has taken his own life. It’s not until a fateful school detention that she meets three other students as lost as she is.

-from Goodreads

WHAT I LIKED

I loved the fact that this play breaks the fourth wall. Heiti doesn’t invite the audience to think about mental illness, but forces them to. The play begins with the cast members in the audience. People who suffer mental illness aren’t “those people over there”, they’re everyone and anyone. The characters don’t even have names: they’re Two, Three, Four, and Five. It allows the reader to relate to them, rather than distancing them with a name that isn’t their own.

I’m sorry, when I read theatre, I automatically go into “essay” mode. Because to me, theatre is just smart and much more fun to analyze. Which I definitely did the entire time I was reading this piece.

I loved the realism of the characters. I loved the way that Heiti incorporated technology and the screen into the play; I thought that was particularly interesting.

AND WHAT I DIDN’T

My only complaint is my usual complaint about what happens when I read theatre: it was too short. I wish I could have seen a production of the play to see how it was interpreted from page to stage, but I guess reading it gave me the freedom to come up with my own ideas of what this story looks like.

RECOMMEND IF…

  • You liked The Breakfast Club;
  • You like literature that breaks the fourth wall; or
  • You are interested in stories about characters who have to overcome intense internal struggles.

Black Dog: 4 vs the Wrld is available online at Chapters Indigo, Book Depository, and Kobo.

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The Fall of Lisa Bellow by Susan Perabo: Book Review

The Fall of Lisa Bellow

Obtained: Simon & Schuster Canada, ARC
Pages: 352
Publish date: March 14, 2017
Rating: ★★★★★

SUMMARY

When eighth grader, Meredith Oliver, walks into a local sandwich shop to grab a root beer, she has no idea the next person through the door is going to be a masked man with a gun. Meredith and her nemesis, Lisa Bellow, end up face to face on the ground as the man robs the joint. Next thing Meredith knows, the man has taken Lisa and leaves her to cower on the floor alone.

The majority of the novel focuses on the reactions to this event. Lisa’s friends creating bracelets for awareness of her abduction. Lisa’s mother dealing with the loss of her daughter. Meredith being the girl that was lucky enough to get away – but not really. And Meredith’s mother, who can’t deal with the fact that her daughter isn’t as unscathed as she appears.

WHAT I LIKED

Honestly, I was not in the mood to read when I picked up this book. But I needed to read something, and Lisa Bellow was the thing I decided to read. I literally started the book on Friday morning and didn’t put it down until I was finished Sunday morning. It was so captivating.

I loved reading about Meredith and the incident that she was witness to, and how it affected her so deeply and personally. I felt like I was there with her. The characters – every single one of them – were so three-dimensional and realistic, I didn’t find myself hating any of them. I particularly liked the fact that Meredith’s mother was so flawed, and yet she wasn’t a “Terrible Mother” character. I don’t see that a lot in media, honestly, and it was sort of heart-warming to be reading about a mother who had a lot of issues but was ultimately sympathetic.

AND WHAT I DIDN’T

The chapters alternated between the perspective of Meredith and her mother, Claire, giving us a wide perspective of their family dynamic and how everyone was affected by Lisa’s abduction. I liked getting this immensely detailed portrait of the Oliver family, but I didn’t particularly like reading Claire’s chapters. I just wanted to rush through those and learn more about Meredith and what she was going through.

*SPOILERS AHEAD*

Sort of spoilers. But okay, you’ve been warned. I love when books have open endings, especially in situations such as this one. The whole, “you’ll never know because no one would ever know. People could guess what happened, or reasons why it happened, but it’ll always be a mystery”. That kind of stuff hooks me right in. But I wish there were a few more answers at the end of this novel. I had too many questions and wish that some of them had gotten resolved. But again, I guess that was the point.

RECOMMEND IF…

  • You enjoy books about characters who have undergone a trauma;
  • You like reading about young people but you want something more mature than a “young adult” book;
  • You have a large chunk of time to be reading – because you won’t want to put this one down.

The Fall of Lisa Bellow is available online at Chapters Indigo, Book Depository, and Kobo.

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Confessions of a High School Disaster by Emma Chastain: Book Review

Confessions of a High School Disaster: Chloe Snow's Diary

Obtained: Simon & Schuster Canada, ARC
Pages: 352
Publish date: March 7, 2017
Rating: ★★★★

SUMMARY

Chloe Snow is just starting her freshman year of high school, and is still a kissing virgin. On top of joining extracurriculars, dealing with her drifting bestie, and the fact that her mom has gone to Mexico for 4 months to “work”, Chloe has a list of boys she’d like to kiss and has made it her personal mission to do so by New Year’s Eve. Because she gets so caught up with the idea of getting kissed, Chloe starts to lose sight of the other things that are going on around her.

WHAT I LIKED

Confession of a High School Disaster was one of the best young readers books I’ve read in a while on the topic of high school dating. The plot originally sounded fairly typical, but what I loved about this book was the fact that it’s so accurate. Chloe is fourteen. When a girl is just becoming a teenager, she is naive and selfish. And the way Chastain wrote from Chloe’s perspective was perfect – everything was about Chloe getting her kiss, or winning the guy, or getting a part in the school musical, that she just didn’t see anything else that was happening in her life.

I also loved the characters. There are only a handful of books where I finish and actually get sad because I feel like I can’t hang out with my friends anymore – the characters are so relatable and real to me. I feel that connection with Confessions. Not so much towards Chloe, honestly, but Tristan was my favourite, and I really loved Chloe’s dad. (I guess I relate more to the adults now, don’t I?)

AND WHAT I DIDN’T

There honestly wasn’t anything that really turned me off about this book. If there was one criticism, I’d say I felt like the antagonists could have been more dynamic, but again, the book was written from the perspective of a girl who would have thought these people to be evil, and not given them a second thought. Girls like Sienna and Bernadette do get their moments to flourish subtextually, but I wish I’d gotten to know them a little better.

RECOMMEND IF…

  • You like stories about growing up.
  • You want an easy, fun read that is also captivating.
  • You enjoy teen books about romance where the characters aren’t ridiculously mature for their age. (Pet peeve of mine – I hate when 14-year-olds talk like they’re 25).

Confessions of a High School Disaster is available online at Chapters Indigo, Book Depository, and Kobo.

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Running by Cara Hoffman: Book Review

Running

Obtained: Simon & Schuster Canada, ARC
Pages: 288
Publish date: February 21, 2017
Rating: ★★★★

Summary

Running brings together an ensemble of outsiders who get by as “runners”—hustlers who sell tourists on low-end accommodations for a small commission and a place to stay.

Bridey Sullivan, a young American woman who has fled a peculiar and traumatic upbringing in Washington State, takes up with a queer British couple, the poet Milo Rollack and Eton drop-out Jasper Lethe. Slipping in and out of homelessness, addiction, and under-the-table jobs, they create their own kind of family as they struggle to survive.

Goodreads

What I Liked

If you know me, you know that I read the summary of this book and jumped at the chance to read it. A cast of anti-hero characters in 1980s Athens? This book had me at ‘hello’! The story was so well-crafted and the poetic writing brought me directly into the setting. And honestly, I feel like the realism of the characters and the setting were my favourite things about reading this book.

As I began reading, I found it sort of hard to get into the book (because of my own reading slump, not because the writing was bad in any way), but once I started reading the dialogue written in Milo’s accent, or got a description of where the characters were, I got pulled right in. I think I read most of this book in one sitting – it was just very captivating.

And What I Didn’t

Like I said earlier, it took me a little bit of time to get into the book, so once I was finally drawn in, it took me some time to catch up. Otherwise, I didn’t really have anything I didn’t like about this book!

Recommend if…

  • You read the summary and went “this sounds right up my alley!”;
  • You enjoyed books like Trainspotting;
  • You want to read about anti-heroes and LGBT characters living in a place that isn’t North America (for once) (what, who said that).

Running is available online at Chapters Indigo, Book Depository, and Kobo.

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The Impossible Fortress by Jason Rekulak: Book Review

The Impossible Fortress

Obtained: Simon & Schuster Canada, ARC
Pages: 304
Publish date: February 7, 2017
Rating: ★★★

Summary

The Impossible Fortress is about Billy Marvin, a 14-year-old boy growing up in the 1980s who is addicted to his Commodore 64. This game-coding kid and his friends discover that Playboy has released some scandalous photos of Wheel of Fortune‘s Vanna White, and they need to get their hands on a copy. The mission to buy a Playboy ends up getting a little bit out of hand, and in order to impress the guys, Billy has to steal a security code from the girl at the corner store by flirting with her. But when he learns about Mary’s mad game-coding skills and the two of them begin creating their own game, he starts to actually care about her.

What I Liked

I thought it was great how Rekulak was able to capture being a teenager in 1987 so perfectly. Billy and his friends were crude, made disgusting comments, casually bullied each other – and despite how uncomfortable it made me sometimes, it is very accurate to what it was like growing up at that time. Billy’s character felt very real to me.

I also really enjoyed reading about gaming and coding, because they’re two things I find really interesting. And while I may not be the best at either of them, I know enough to appreciate these hobbies, and it definitely kept me interested in the book.

and What I Didn’t

I honestly had a hard time staying interested in this book. If it weren’t for the plot involving Mary and the video game coding, I honestly would have put the book down. The main plot involving the group of boys trying to break into a store to steal and sell Playboys just wasn’t interesting to me – maybe because I couldn’t relate.

I was also sort of offended that this book was compared to Ready Player One when I was given a summary. That set my expectations pretty high and honestly, let me down a lot.

Recommend if…

  • You enjoy young adult books set in the 80s
  • You like reading about characters who love video games
  • You are looking for a new, light read

The Impossible Fortress is available online at Chapters Indigo, Book Depository, and Kobo.

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The You I’ve Never Known by Ellen Hopkins: Book Review

The You I've Never Known

Obtained: Simon & Schuster Canada, ARC
Pages: 608
Publish date: January 24, 2017
Rating: ★★★★

I am a huge Ellen Hopkins fan. I loved the Crank series, and Identical is probably one of my favourite books ever. So when I heard she had a new book coming out, of course I had to read it. As soon as I opened it, I fell straight into Hopkins’s wonderful writing style and found it hard to put the book down.

The You I’ve Never Known tells two stories: The first is about Ariel, a girl who has grown up jumping home to home with her fairly abusive dad, staying with whichever of his latest women will keep them for a few months. When they finally settle in with a woman who looks like she could be something special, Ariel allows herself to make new friends, and falls for her best friend, Monica. The second story is about a girl named Maya who got pregnant when she was sixteen and got kicked out of her house by her Scientologist mother. Luckily, her soldier boyfriend proposed to her and they started a life  together.

As I will say again and again in Hopkins reviews, I love her writing style. It is very literally poetic. Not only is it a unique way to write a novel, but it also makes me as a reader feel better about reading 600 pages when I can fly through 150 of them easily in an hour. I also really enjoyed how the theme of the book really wrapped into the title, “The You I’ve Never Known” being a side to people you never expected to see – a large part in the case of Ariel, as she questions her sexual identity as bi and the validity of liking different things about different people at the same time. I really liked the way Hopkins portrayed Ariel and this internal struggle, because it felt very real, as something I have gone through before.

But this book didn’t get a perfect 5 stars from me, and here’s why: every Ellen Hopkins book that I’ve loved has a great twist. I love spending the entire book trying to figure out what it’s going to be. But the summary on the back of the book sort of gives it away. Luckily I didn’t read that far into it and just jumped into the book knowing nothing, but I read it afterwards and could see how that would ruin the story a little bit. Also, once I figured out the twist ending and it was revealed to me, there was another 200 pages to sift through. I understand it was important to not just end at the twist and have that development of the aftermath, but it could have been condensed a lot.

Overall, the book still earned 4/5 stars from me, and if you’re a fan of Hopkins or want to read a YA book that’s a little twisted, I highly recommend you don’t miss out on The You I’ve Never Known.

The You I’ve Never Known is available online at Chapters Indigo, Book Depository, and Kobo.

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The Strays by Emily Bitto: Book Review

The Strays
Obtained: Penguin Random House Canada, ARC
Pages: 290
Publish date: January 3, 2017
Rating: ★★★

I picked up this book because it sounded very interesting to me – modern artists in 1930s Australia? I was curious to see what the characters in this book would be like, and how my love of art and the bohemian-esque lifestyle would tie in.

The Strays is told from the perspective of young Lily, who explains how she got extremely wrapped up in her best friend, Eva, whose parents were modern artists at the time. When Lily’s parents are going through a hard time, they send Lily to stay with Eva’s family for an extended period and through this, we glean what Eva’s parents’ lives are like – and the lives of their friends who have also come to live with them.

For me, the positives and negatives of this book sort of weigh equally, so I’ll start with the positives. I loved the writing style. Bitto captures the world of Eva and her artistic family very well. She “paints the picture” very vividly – pun not entirely intended – of Eva and Lily’s friendship, of Eva’s father’s career, and of all of their artist friends’ lifestyle that includes lots of drugs, alcohol, and living for their work. There were parts of this book that really captured my attention – mostly ones that included Eva and Lily spending time with Eva’s sisters, or the parts that illustrated the problematic relationship between the girls and their mother.

On the negative side, I found the protagonist to be really lacking. Lily just seems like an empty vessel through which Eva and her family’s story gets to be told. She doesn’t really seem to have a personality of her own. So when the story starts to develop and show how this artist life has affected them all differently as they grew up, I didn’t really care how it affected Lily at all.

On the whole, I did enjoy reading the book, but I definitely enjoyed reading the sections about Eva and her sisters more than I did about Lily and her family. If the summary sounded at all interesting to you, I recommend you give it a go. It’s not even 300 pages, so it’s a fairly quick read.

The Strays is available online at Chapters Indigo, Book Depository, and Kobo.

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